john cleese

Kreativitet, motivation,…

diciplin.

Snaphanen skriver med afsæt i en John Cleese optræden om kreativitet:

“Kreativitet” er et ord jeg ikke bruger. Det kom for alvor ind i sproget i 70 erne, antageligvis lød det lidt finere end “skabende,” men det er en anglicisme og jeg bryder mig ikke om dem. Vi formelig vader i dem. Når skuespilleren siger “min karakter” i stedet for rolle, person, figur, når “varer” hedder “produkter,” “forebilleder” hedder “rollemodeller,” og “sammenhæng” hedder “kontekst.” (Der er iøvrigt en side om dårlige indvandrerrollemodeller her) Ih, hvor vi lyder som om vi alle har gået på et fjerdeklasses masseuniversitet.

Ude hos GRP har man netop været omkring diciplin og har fundet dette opslag:

151229 motivation diciplin

Og ChinoF skriver bl.a.:

Filipinos do not seem to understand or accept that discipline should not just have an external source. Discipline should come from within. Successful and prosperous societies are peopled by those who do right on their own, not just because they are afraid of punishment; they embrace what is right and believe in it. They rid themselves of or minimize self-entitlement and decided that one should work for their keep. They never believed trying to be above others; they instead believed that they should contribute to the society around and keep respect for public space. What they manifest is self-discipline.

In a comment under an article that compared Singapore and the Philippines, I said this to demonstrate what I believe makes Singapore a relatively better place to live in than the Philippines:

When a Singaporean couple finds prices are rising, they don’t have children. When a Filipino couple finds prices are rising, they bear so many children, hoping at least one of them will be their ATM (automated teller machine, i.e. breadwinner) to cope with rising prices, without thinking that they have to feed and make these children grow first (provided they don’t die from the complications of poverty yet). Different ways of dealing with one reality, different results, and each reveals something about the culture of the country.

Yes there is another side to Singaporeans, with reports coming out of some of them physically abusing domestic helpers. Perhaps the reason is that this generation of Singaporeans have been spoiled, thanks to prosperity. They thus cannot accept that some things they want cannot always be followed. Thus, in a sense, they are undisciplined. Without the discipline that counteracts spoilage, people will thus develop sense of entitlement that makes them act nastily towards others.

John Cleese: